Friday, June 15, 2018

Olympic Sculpture Park, #Seattle - #SaturdaySnapshots

This past Tuesday I went on a lovely walk through the Olympic Sculpture Park on the Seattle waterfront. The site was a former fuel storage and transfer facility, and clean-up of the contamination began in the 1990s. The sculpture park opened in January, 2007, and is part of the Seattle Art Museum. It overlooks Elliot Bay of Puget Sound. 

The nine-acre park is adjacent to Myrtle Edwards Park and Elliott Bay Park, which our group also enjoyed. The parks are free and open to the public. Here's a sample of what I saw:

"Split" by Roxy Paine, 2003
"The Eagle" by Alexander Calder, 1971
Olympic Mountains in the background.
Cyclists, joggers, families, school groups -- all enjoying a beautiful day
Clever bench design. I don't know the artist's name.
"Perre's Ventaglio III" by Beverly Pepper, 1967
"Schubert Sonata" by Mark di Suvero, 1992
This kinetic sculpture moves in the breeze. 
"Echo" by Jaume Plensa
"Father and Son" by Louise Bourgeois, 2004-2006
An inviting rose garden, too.



More info: Seattle Art Museum Map and Guide

Saturday Snapshots is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. 
To participate: 
Post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky on West Metro Mommy Read's website (link: HERE) Photos can be old or new and be of any subject as long as they are clean and appropriate for all eyes to see. How much detail you give in the caption is entirely up to you. Please don't post random photos that you find online.




Friday, June 1, 2018

Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, WA - #SaturdaySnapshots

Called "The Gateway to the San Juans," Friday Harbor is one of those places I've been wanting to visit ever since we moved to Washington State. This past week that finally happened. We traveled with a group from Auburn to Anacortes, Washington, via bus and then walked onto the ferry and sailed to Friday Harbor. Here are a few photos of this charming town.

The town of Friday Harbor, viewed from the ferry dock.
San Juan Island boasts a population of just over 2,000 people.

We had limited time on the island (day trip), so we had to set some priorities. First thing: visit San Juan Vineyards! We hired a taxi and headed for this charming winery out in the countryside, about 10 minutes from the ferry dock.



The tasting room used to be a schoolhouse, built in 1895
and beautifully remodeled. 

The vineyard's previous owners built this chapel,
but it looks like it's always been there.

This small winery offers only four selections (fruity white wines) and they can only be purchased on the island. We tasted them all and brought home four bottles. 




I'm enjoying a glass of Siegerrebe
and a little sunshine.
After our wine tasting, we taxied back to town, had lunch, and ate an ice cream cone before boarding the ferry for our return trip.

Views from the ferry ride. The day started out overcast but slowly cleared and turned into a beautiful afternoon.






I'd like to come back again and spend a few days at a B&B, take a whale watching excursion, explore the town's many museums, and sample its restaurants. One afternoon definitely wasn't enough.

More info:
San Juan Vineyards Website
San Juan Islands / Friday Harbor Info
Rhode Trips Taxi & Tours Website


Saturday Snapshots is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. 
To participate: 
Post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky on West Metro Mommy Read's website (link: HERE) Photos can be old or new and be of any subject as long as they are clean and appropriate for all eyes to see. How much detail you give in the caption is entirely up to you. Please don't post random photos that you find online.


Saturday, May 19, 2018

What's In a Name? - #Hiking Trails - #SaturdaySnapshots

Since I love words and names, the designations given to hiking trails fascinate me. Some are named after naturalists, historical figures, or landmarks. For others, the source of the names is obscure.  

Cougar Mountain Trails: 
Anti-Aircraft Peak Trailhead at King County's Cougar Mountain Wildland Park was renamed in honor of Harvey Manning, a longtime open space advocate and hiking guidebook author.
FYI: During the Cold War of the 1950s, this area housed anti-aircraft missiles and radar.


Red Town Trail: A mining town by the same name existed here in the late 1800s. It served as a railroad depot where coal was transported from the mines to Lake Washington. Most of the houses were painted red. 
By the way, we walked on the "Wildside" too.



Rattlesnake Mountain Trail: An article in The Seattle Times says:  "The lake and nearby ridge are said to have gotten their inapt name from Seattle pioneer Arthur Denny when the rattle of seed pods on a nearby meadow frightened a road surveyor into thinking he was being attacked by a rattler. The surveyor didn't know there were no poisonous snakes in Western Washington."  


My online research didn't uncover the history of the name Dewey Lake. However, the Naches Peak Loop (pronounced "NAT cheese") is named after a Native American tribe. Anyone who has read Wild by Cheryl Strayed has heard of the Pacific Crest Trail.


The idea behind the name of the High Ridge Trail is obvious.  The pathway snakes across a ridge in Olympic National Park.



Are you as curious about place names as I am?




Saturday Snapshots is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. 
To participate: 
Post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky on West Metro Mommy Read's website (link: HERE) Photos can be old or new and be of any subject as long as they are clean and appropriate for all eyes to see. How much detail you give in the caption is entirely up to you. Please don't post random photos that you find online.


Saturday, April 28, 2018

Cougar Mountain / Coal Creek Falls - #SaturdaySnapshots

I've explored Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park three times with the Auburn Senior Activity Center group, and each experience has been different. We always hike for a couple of hours and then stop at Coal Creek Falls for lunch in beautiful surroundings, but we take different trails and the hikes are never the same.

For example, here are the falls in April, 2016. We'd had a dry winter and there was a lower-than-normal snowpack in the Cascade Mountains. The result: the danger of wildfires increased and water available for crop irrigation declined. 


Here are the falls during my April 20, 2018, hike. Much more dramatic!


This year, quite a few trails were closed. Our recent rainfall had turned some paths into streams--slippery and unsafe for hikers. We slogged through a few muddy patches and skirted mud puddles, but the trails we explored were fine. That day I logged eight miles on my Fitbit. (That included walking the grand-dog around our neighborhood.) A good workout. 

My previous posts about Cougar Mountain (located in the "Issaquah Alps") are HERE (2016)  and HERE (2017) . 


Saturday Snapshots is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. 
To participate: 
Post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky on West Metro Mommy Read's website (link: HERE) Photos can be old or new and be of any subject as long as they are clean and appropriate for all eyes to see. How much detail you give in the caption is entirely up to you. Please don't post random photos that you find online.